Archive for the 'Science' Category

Science: Time / Space continuum breaks open around the globe

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Today, April 1st after various warnings raised by leading scientists during the last months, the selective opening of the Time / Space continuum could be observed at locations around the world.

Renown astronomer Gabriel Sunbreek had alarm bell ringing about 3 months ago when he together with his team for the first time discovered the brief opening of wormholes inside our solar system. Closely to Mars two of these phenomenons had opened up for about 5 to 7 minutes – enough to allow alien matter to enter our galaxy close to earth (in astronomical terms).

Together with colleagues he attributed the selective occurrence of breaks within the Time / Space continuum to global warming and increased pollution. The connection to the newly found wormholes is still being evaluated…

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Melodyne – Direct Note Access

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The German company “Celemony” has announced that the new version of their popular audio editing software Melodyne will allow access to individual notes and chords within audio files. This is almost incredible – but if it works as shown in their video they really have made the impossible possible.

We are talking polyphonic audio (wave) recording here and not MIDI input. The abilities of the technology called…

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Data-Visualization: Pi played on the piano

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As it will be Pi-Day (14-March) this week we would like to remind you to “Felix Jung’s” great visualization and sonification of the number pi…

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Joseph Weizenbaum is dead

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Joseph Weizenbaum died yesterday in Berlin as a result of a stroke at the age of 85.

Throughout his life he has provided many outstanding contributions to computer science and AI. After he created the first banking computer in the world while working for General Electric he took up a position at the MIT as professor for applied and political science. In 1966 he published “ELIZA” – his best know work – and the first computer program demonstrating natural language processing. His academic contributions include the creation of the SLIP (symmetric List Processor) programming language and research on pointers, list structures and garbage collection schemes.

Over the years he also became one of the strongest critics of computer science and a society that blindly believes into technology. His influential book “Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment To Calculation” displayed his grown ambivalence towards computer technology. Many concepts from this book have by now become common understandings like, for example, how programmers are seen by society or his critics of the promises by AI.

In one of his last mails “Joseph Weizenbaum” wrote: (translated from German)

…our death is the last service we can provide to the world: Would we not go out of the way the following generations would not need to re-create human culture. Culture would become fixed, unchangeable and die. And with the death of culture humanity would also perish…

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Games / Multi-touch screens: The Fentix Cube

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We came across the name Andrew Fentem a few times when we did research on multi-touch screens the last years. The Fentix Cube one of his most recent work is the first cubic multi-touchscreen games platform. In the video clip below the Fentix Cube has been programmed to emulate a Rubik’s cube puzzle…

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Science: Nanotechnology barcodes to identify biological weapons

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You might still remember the scene from the movie “Blade Runner” when Harrison Ford with the help of a chemist and the serial number on microscopic scale finds out what type of material he is looking at. It seems we got just one step closer to be able to do something similar today. Scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently developed a novel bio-sensing platform that uses engineered nanowires for biochemical tests…

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